Rescheduled from 2020 - All tickets honored

Enter The Haggis

with Adam Ezra Group

Wed, September 8, 2021

State Theatre

Doors: 7:00pm - Show: 8:00pm - all ages

$20 advance
$25 day of show

The State Theatre box office will open 1 hour before doors night of show.

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Enter The Haggis

Due to the global health crisis and current state mandates on mass gatherings, the Enter The Haggis show originally scheduled for 3/14/20, 6/25/20, 3/5/21 at Port City Music Hall has been rescheduled for SEPTEMBER 8, 2021 and moved to the State Theatre. All Port City Music Hall tickets will be honored at the new date. Preferred seating ticket holders will automatically receive a partial refund of $20.


For the better part of two decades, Toronto’s Enter The Haggis has combined bagpipes and fiddles with a rock rhythm section to create a distinctively eclectic sound, praised by The Boston Globe, The Washington Post and Canada’s Globe and Mail. Their songs offer singalong melodies and deep, meaningful lyrics which tell the stories of everyday hard working people, often faced with seemingly insurmountable challenges. Signature songs like “One Last Drink”, “Gasoline”, “Down With The Ship” and “Lancaster Gate” have had hundreds of thousands of plays on social media, appeared in Hollywood movies, and have been performed and recorded by artists around the world.

Enter The Haggis is clearly comfortable on the stage and develops an easy rapport with audiences, sharing the stories behind their songs and laughing through tour anecdotes. The show is exciting and dynamic, featuring unpredictable and spontaneous moments. One song might feature drummer Bruce McCarthy taking a drum solo on Trevor Lewington’s guitar strings, while the next song breaks down into a fierce battle between fiddle and harmonica. Sometimes during an encore, the band will leave the stage entirely to perform acoustically standing on chairs in the audience.

Enter The Haggis’ commitment to putting on a great show every single night has made them a favorite at festivals and performing arts centers across the US and Canada. As a result, ETH shows have become an annual tradition on some of the most prestigious stages on the continent. The band has also brought hundreds of fans on eight tours of Ireland, forging deeper friendships with their supporters while exploring ancient landmarks and natural wonders across the country. The next trip is planned for October 11th-19th 2019.

Enter The Haggis has appeared on “Live with Regis and Kelly” and “A&E’s Breakfast With The Arts”, and was the feature of an hour-long PBS concert special which aired for months on more than eighty affiliate stations across the US. The band’s legions of die-hard fans (the self-described “Haggis Heads”) have crowdfunded the last four ETH albums, and played a huge part in propelling the most recent full-length record to its debut at #9 on the national “Billboard Heatseekers” chart. The group’s friendly, welcoming attitude is responsible for the close relationship it has with its supporters, and all five band members truly enjoy taking time after every show to meet with people one on one.

Enter The Haggis is currently trading off between touring and working on its tenth studio album in Toronto, set for release late 2018.

Adam Ezra Group

Adam Ezra felt alone. It was March of 2020, and as the COVID-19 pandemic began tightening its deadly grip across the United States, the roots rock stalwart found himself forced off the road for the first time in years, stuck at home with a calendar full of cancelled tour dates and no one to perform for. Concerned by the chaos unfolding around him but certain he wasn’t the only one in search of some kind of solace, Ezra decided to pick up his guitar, turn on his phone, and do what he’d always done in times of worry or doubt: play a show.

“I just started livestreaming from my house,” Ezra recalls. “It was a way to connect with people, to feel a little less lost, a little less scared. I played and talked for about an hour, and then at the end of the stream, I told everybody, ‘I’ll come back tomorrow if you come back tomorrow.’”

Ezra kept his promise and then some, returning every single night after that for what he and his fans would eventually come to call The Gathering Series. Interactive and improvisatory, the shows took shape on the fly, drawing on daily life and frequently featuring newly written material and never performed songs from Ezra’s extensive back catalog. Through his own harrowing battle with COVID, a move to the Mojave Desert, a socially distanced summer tour, and even his wedding day, Ezra never missed a performance, broadcasting without fail from wherever he found himself each night at 7pm Eastern. Driven by a belief that small grassroots communities have the power to impact the world, Ezra – who has gone live daily since March 13th – has reached a cumulative audience of well over 12 million viewers worldwide, a staggering feat for any artist that stands as a testament, not only to his artistic endurance, but also his ability to provide an accepting and supportive space for newcomers joining his tight-knit community of fans during a time when it’s needed more than ever.

“The people who watch every night, they’re tuning in for me, but they’re also tuning in for each other,” says Ezra. “They’re tuning in for comfort and compassion and connection, but maybe also a sense of normalcy and grounding during this time that seems to be shaking the very foundations of who we’ve always thought we were. As special as The Gathering Series is, I don’t think it could have achieved this kind of success if we didn’t have this incredible fan community around us that is inspired by engagement and activism.”

Working outside the confines of the traditional music industry, Ezra and his band, the Adam Ezra Group, built that foundation through sheer grit and determination, regularly performing hundreds of shows a year for the past two decades without any major label or mainstream radio support. Fusing folk intimacy and rock energy with soul power and pop charm, the band first emerged from Boston in the early 2000s and quickly garnered widespread acclaim for their bold, insightful songwriting and interactive, euphoric performances. From hole in the wall bars and house concerts to sold-out headline shows and dates with the likes of Little Big Town, The Wallflowers, Gavin DeGraw, Train, and The Wailers, Ezra and his bandmates treated every single gig like their last, attracting a die-hard following that believed not just in the music, but in their commitment to activism and social change, as well. Charity events and fundraisers were a regular part of the group’s touring schedule, and each year, thousands of Adam Ezra Group fans would gather in Boston for the band’s homegrown festival, The Ramble, which raised money and marshaled resources to help homeless veterans find safe and dignified housing.

“With the pandemic raging, 2020 was going to be the first time in ten years that we couldn’t host a Ramble,” says Ezra, “so we decided to incorporate it into The Gathering Series and put on a 24-hour, non-stop livestream. It was a crazy idea, but by the end of it, we had tens of thousands of people rambling with us from around the world and we’d broken our previous fundraising record, collecting enough money to help 64 of our veteran heroes off the streets.”

While that 24-hour livestream was undoubtedly the most taxing installment of The Gathering Series, finding ways to broadcast a new, unscripted hour of live music every night for a year was rarely easy. In April, Ezra came down with COVID and found himself so weak he could barely get out of bed to perform. In May, he and his wife traded Massachusetts for the Mojave, setting up a temporary home base in a cabin outside Joshua Tree, where Ezra would continue to stream daily from the desert. Over the summer, he and the band cooked up a way to bring The Gathering Series to the real world, performing nearly 50 safe, socially distanced shows in parks and backyards around the country while still managing to go live every night at 7pm.

Apart from the emotional and physical commitment, playing every night hasn’t been without its logistical challenges as well. “I remember one night I was in a hotel, and the WiFi went out,” says Ezra. “I jumped in the van and just started driving until I found service, and then I pulled over and played the show right there on the side of the road from the driver’s seat. Turned out to be one of my favorite memories looking back on the year.”

As if 365 shows in a year isn’t enough to keep them busy, Ezra and his bandmates—fiddler Corinna Smith, drummer Alex Martin, and bassist Poche Ponce—also embarked on an ambitious new recording series in 2020. Dubbed The Album Project, the endeavor will see the band releasing 18 new singles over the next few years, trading in the traditional LP format for a steady flow of fresh material designed to keep their ever-expanding community active and engaged even beyond the pandemic. The series opens up, fittingly enough, with “All Right Today,” an effervescent, feel-good ode to putting one foot in front of the other, to living in the moment and leaning on one another to get through our hardest times.

“I wrote that song years before COVID,” says Ezra, “but that line, ‘We will be all right today,’ kept coming back to me through this whole experience. It felt like a mantra I continue to lean on right now and the right way to kick this whole thing off.”

What comes next for the Adam Ezra Group? Perhaps another socially distanced tour. Perhaps another 24-hour livestream. Perhaps something even crazier. The future is anyone’s guess right now, and the only thing Adam Ezra knows for sure is where he’ll be at 7pm tonight, and that he definitely doesn’t feel alone anymore.